Tips to improve your back swing

The key to a natural back swing is to focus on your shoulders turning back and letting your arms go back naturally.

Swing down and through the swing, turn the hips, swing the arms down and un-cock the wrists.

If you start turning the shoulders with the club, hands and arms you won’t have anywhere for them to go once the shoulders have reached their max turn.

 

How to hit a draw?

A draw requires that the club is moving close to along the target line and strike the ball with the clubface slightly closed.

You have to be sure that you’re really closing the face relative to your hands, not just rotating your hands so the face is closed at address.

Make sure that you’ve adjusted your stance so that the ball takes off on the line you intended, not in a pull direction right into the tree that you’re trying to draw around.

A draw, or hook, shot starts right and then curves left. Use it when a direct shot at your target is blocked, for example on a dogleg hole or if you need to curve the shot around some trees that are in the way.

The draw is more of a subtle curve than the hook, which is very strong and often end up in the rough unless you did it deliberately and calculated it into your aim.

The draw starts off pretty straight and then starts to fall off to the left.

A draw shot makes the ball roll further when it lands because it puts a forward spin on the ball. Note that these steps are intended for right-handers – reverse them if you’re left-handed.

The angle of your feet depends on your individual swing and desired results and can range from 5 to 45 degrees.

Swing normally. Resist the temptation to turn too soon and watch the ball’s flight.

 

How to hit a fade?

Often when you’re playing a dog leg right hole you ‘d like your drive to start off fairly straight but end up right – this is when you ‘d like to hit a fade shot off the tee.

To hit a fade, you need to follow a few simple steps at alignment that will help create the swing path that will put the proper spin on the ball to make it travel to the.

The following steps are for right handed golfers, if you’re a lefty, just reverse the directions.

Address the ball on the tee with your standard alignment and grip.

After you’ve setup as usual, you’ll want to aim your feet to the left of your target.

You’ll want to adjust the aim of your feet about 10 to 15 degrees more than your traditional alignment.

You can adjust this angle when you practice to get a feel for how different alignments affect the trajectory of the ball’s flight path. Now, aim an open club face directly at your target and maintain your regular grip.

Take your normal swing and your ball should fade.

Avoid the temptation of modifying your swing too much to ‘force’ a fade. Let your alignment and the club do the work.

Make sure you practice this at the driving range before you attempt this on the course.

When you are learning, an attempted fade can very easily turn into a severe slice and you can end up in unplayable territory.

As with anything in golf, don’t get frustrated if you don’t master this shot immediately.

Practice makes perfect!

Thank you for taking the time to read our article.

If you enjoyed our content, we'd really appreciate some "love" with a share or two.

And ... Don't forget to have fun!

Comments are closed.